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Release Date: 03/02/2015

Caring for high-risk pregnant women and their developing fetuses takes a certain level of expertise and specialization.

Several specialists from the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine (MFM) at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, a Care New England hospital, recently shared their expertise with colleagues at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual Pregnancy Meeting.

According to the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, the goal of the Pregnancy Meeting is "to share the latest innovations in research and clinical care. Through educational seminars and research presentations, the conference brings together MFM specialists in training, practicing clinicians and veterans in the field to share clinical wisdom, original research, and a dedication to improving outcomes for mothers and babies."

"When a normal pregnancy becomes complicated or a woman with medical issues becomes pregnant, she needs highly specialized care, like the care provided by maternal-fetal medicine specialists," said Maureen G. Phipps, MD, MPH, chief of obstetrics and gynecology at Women & Infants Hospital, executive chief of obstetrics and gynecology at Care New England, Chair and Chace-Joukowsky Professor in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology and assistant dean for teaching and research in women's health at the Alpert Medical School, and professor of epidemiology at the Brown University School of Public Health. "It is imperative that those providers who have expertise in specific health issues share that knowledge, such as in forums like the Pregnancy Meeting. This is how we will be able to continue to improve the outcomes for pregnant women and their developing babies."

Giving invited presentations were:

  • Brenna L. (Anderson) Hughes, MD, MSc – Infectious disease post-graduate course co-director – "Advances in Hepatitis Infection;" and Master's series luncheon roundtable – "Diagnosis and Management of Congenital CMV Infection."
  • Lindsay Maggio, MD – Scientific forum – "Pregnancy as a Window to Future Cardiovascular Health: A Literature Update."
  • Barbara M. O'Brien, MD – Scientific forum – "Expanded Screening for Deletion/Duplication Syndromes and Additional Trisomies."
  • Erika Werner, MD, MS – Scientific forum – "Preventing Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Before and During Pregnancy."

In addition, several MFM specialists from Women & Infants/Brown University presented research findings:

  • Catherine Albright, MD, Werner and (Anderson) Hughes – "Universal cytomegalovirus screening in pregnancy: a cost-effectiveness analysis."
  • Maureen Hamel, MD, and Werner – "Cost-effectiveness of transvaginal ultrasound cervical length screening in singletons without prior preterm birth: an update."
  • Alisse Hauspurg, MD, Albright, Rouse and Werner – "Third trimester fetal growth ultrasound: a cost-benefit analysis."
  • Maggio, Rouse, (Anderson) Hughes – "Optimal dosing in cefazolin in obese women undergoing cesarean delivery: a double-blinded randomized control trial."
  • Rouse – "The relationship of maternal age, BMI, and infant birth weight to uterine activity and labor progress."
  • Rouse – "The association between cerebral palsy or death and umbilical cord blood magnesium concentration."
  • Leanna Sudhof, MD, and Dwight Rouse, MD, MSPH and (Anderson) Hughes – "Choice of trial of labor after cesarean and association with likelihood of success."
  • Werner – "Mode of delivery and outcomes in twins less than 32 weeks gestation."
  • Werner – "Thyroid function abnormalities among obese gravidas."
  • Werner – "Examining the utility of proteinuria screening in obese gravidas."
  • Werner – "What should a MFM do with an abnormal umbilical artery doppler (UAD) study in a normally grown fetus?"

The Society of Maternal-Fetal Medicine was established in 1977 to give maternal-fetal medicine physicians and scientists a place to share knowledge, research and clinical best practices in order to improve care for moms and babies. Maternal-fetal physicians are obstetricians with additional training in the area of high-risk, complicated pregnancies.

About Women & Infants Hospital

Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, a Care New England hospital, is one of the nation’s leading specialty hospitals for women and newborns. A major teaching affiliate of The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University for obstetrics, gynecology and newborn pediatrics, as well as a number of specialized programs in women’s medicine, Women & Infants is the 12th largest stand-alone obstetrical service in the country and the largest in New England with approximately 8,500 deliveries per year. A Designated Baby-Friendly® USA hospital, U.S.News & World Report 2014-15 Best Children’s Hospital in Neonatology and a 2014 Leapfrog Top Hospital, in 2009 Women & Infants opened what was at the time the country’s largest, single-family room neonatal intensive care unit.

Women & Infants and Brown offer fellowship programs in gynecologic oncology, maternal-fetal medicine, urogynecology and reconstructive pelvic surgery, neonatal-perinatal medicine, pediatric and perinatal pathology, gynecologic pathology and cytopathology, and reproductive endocrinology and infertility. It is home to the nation’s first mother-baby perinatal psychiatric partial hospital, as well as the nation’s only fellowship program in obstetric medicine.

Women & Infants has been designated as a Breast Imaging Center of Excellence by the American College of Radiography; a Center of Excellence in Minimally Invasive Gynecology; a Center of Biomedical Research Excellence by the National Institutes of Health (NIH); and a Neonatal Resource Services Center of Excellence. It is one of the largest and most prestigious research facilities in high risk and normal obstetrics, gynecology and newborn pediatrics in the nation, and is a member of the National Cancer Institute’s Gynecologic Oncology Group and the Pelvic Floor Disorders Network.
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