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Woman And Infants

Pamela High - Pediatrics Faculty Profile

Pamela High
Pediatrician • Professor, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

MD, University of Florida, Gainesville, 1976
401-444-5440
phigh@lifespan.org

Dr. Pamela High directs the Division of Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics (DBP) at Rhode Island Hospital/The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and serves as Program Director for fellowship and residency training in Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. In addition she directs the Infant Development Center’s, Infant Cry, Behavior and Sleep Program at Women & Infants and co-directs the Hasbro Partial Hospital Program.

Dr. High’s interests are medical education in developmental and behavioral pediatrics and interdisciplinary collaboration. She has organized pediatric grand rounds for the Department of Pediatrics at Rhode Island Hospital since 1995.  She is the current President of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics as well as Chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Early Childhood, Adoption and Foster Care.

Her clinical and research interests include infant behavioral issues such as colic, sleep problems and feeding problems, anticipatory guidance including literacy promotion in primary care, and the interrelationship of medical and psychological problems in childhood.

Selected Publications
• D'Sa, VA, High, PC. Resident Education in Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics: The Impact of the 80 Hour Work Week. Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics. 31(3):230-232, April 2010.
• Miller-Loncar C, Bigsby R, High PC, Wallach M and Lester BM, Infant Colic and Feeding Difficulties, Archives of Diseases in Childhood. October 2004, 89(10):908-912.
• Roesler TA, Rickerby ML, Nassau JH, High PC. Treating a high risk population: A collaboration of Child Psychiatry and Pediatrics. Medicine and Health – Rhode Island, 2002, 85:265-268.
• High PC, LaGasse L, Becker S, Ahlgren I, Gardner A. Literacy Promotion in Primary Care Pediatrics: Can we make a difference? Pediatrics, 2000; 105:4, 927-934.

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